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What Are the Carbon Emissions Elasticities for Income and Population? New Evidence From Heterogeneous Panel Estimates Robust to Stationarity and Cross-Sectional Dependence

This paper uses the STIRPAT model to determine what are the carbon emissions elasticities for income and population and whether those elasticities differ across development/income or population levels. (from Introduction)

Liddle, Brant. 2012. What Are the Carbon Emissions Elasticities for Income and Population? New Evidence From Heterogeneous Panel Estimates Robust to Stationarity and Cross-Sectional Dependence. USAEE Working Paper No. 12-135

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2162222
Working Paper

The China Project

The University Committee on Environment's China Project is a multidisciplinary research program on energy use and environment in China and in Sino-American relations. The program explores integrated policy responses to greenhouse gas emissions by the world's two leading national sources, the U.S. and China, and to local air pollution problems of immediate concern in China. Over 50 researchers from the two countries comprise the team, working in disciplines that range across natural, applied, and health sciences, economics, public policy, law, political science, and business. (from project website)

The China Project

Research Project

Environmental influences on skilled worker migration from Bangladesh to Canada

In this stidy, focus groups in Toronto with 44 recent skilled worker immigrants from Bangladesh, was conducted to explore whether their decisions to migrate to Canada may have been influenced by environmental problems.

McLeman, R., et al. 2018. Environmental influences on skilled worker migration from Bangladesh to Canada. The Canadian Geographer / Le Géographe canadien 62(3): 352-371.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/cag.12430
Journal Article
Year: 2018

Does climate matter? An empirical study of interregional migration in China

The authosr developed a robust empirical approach based on a correlated random effects model and a prefecture‐level panel dataset which allows the study to account for both within province migration flows and prefecture‐specific characteristics, to study the role of local climate conditions in spurring interregional migration in China over the period 2000 to 2010.

Gao, L. and A. G. Sam. Does climate matter? An empirical study of interregional migration in China. Papers in Regional Science, DOI: 10.1111/pirs.12335

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/pirs.12335
Journal Article
Year: 2018

Thinking about the future: the four billion question (Penser à l'avenir: la question des quatre milliards)

In this article, the author claims that with four billion extra inhabitants on our planet in the next century constitute a serious threat to survival, greater than most observers acknowledge. He argues that greater international cooperation is needed both to achieve the goal of curbing demographic growth and to manage the already scarce resources of our planet.

Llivi-Bacci, Massimo. Thinking about the future: the four billion question (Penser à l'avenir: la question des quatre milliards).  N-IUSSP.ORG February 12, 2018.

Year: 2018

Structuring the emotional landscape of climate change migration: Towards climate mobilities in geography

Aiming to resolve the disjuncture between ‘objective’ and subjective accounts of the environment, this paper uses the case of a Cambodian beggar to show how recent developments across three fields have laid the groundwork for the structural and emotional dimensions of climate change response to be engaged with under a coherent theoretical rubric.

Parsons, L.  2018. Structuring the emotional landscape of climate change migration: Towards climate mobilities in geography. Progress in Human Geography, DOI: 10.1177/0309132518781011.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1177/0309132518781011
Journal Article
Year: 2018

Human mobility in the context of climate change and disasters: a South American approach

This paper shows that in South American states, human mobility in the context of disasters and climate change endangers the lives of millions of people and their livelihoods and reveals that disasters are triggers of displacement and affect human mobility.

Lilian, Y., et al. 2018. Human mobility in the context of climate change and disasters: a South American approach. International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management 10(1): 65-85.

DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1108/IJCCSM-03-2017-0069
Journal Article
Year: 2018

Does climate matter? An empirical study of interregional migration in China

Using a robust empirical approach based on a correlated random effects model and a prefecture-level panel dataset, the study focuses on the role of local climate conditions in spurring interregional migration in China over the period 2000 to 2010.

Gao, L. and A. G. Sam. Does climate matter? An empirical study of interregional migration in China. Papers in Regional Science, https://doi.org/10.1111/pirs.12335

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/pirs.12335
Journal Article
Year: 2018

Climate change, human impacts, and carbon sequestration in China

This paper explores the impacts of climate change and human activities on the structure and functioning of ecosystems, with emphasis on quantifying the magnitude and distribution of carbon (C) pools and C sequestration in China’s terrestrial ecosystems.

Fang, J., et al. 2018. Climate change, human impacts, and carbon sequestration in China. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 115(16): 4015-4020

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1700304115
Journal Article
Year: 2018

Health Disorder of Climate Migrants in Khulna City: An Urban Slum Perspective

In the last decade, the population in Khulna City, Bangladesh increased by more than 20 per cent due to migration from nearby climate vulnerable districts. This study explores the health disorders of climate migrants occupying the urban slums and squats of the city area.

Rahaman, M. A., et al. 2018. Health Disorder of Climate Migrants in Khulna City: An Urban Slum Perspective. International Migration 56(5): 42-55.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/imig.12460
Journal Article
Year: 2018

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