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Effect of oil spills on infant mortality in Nigeria

The authors study how onshore oil spills affect neonatal and infant mortality by combining spatial data from the Nigerian Oil Spill Monitor with Demographic and Health Surveys. They compare siblings born to the same mother, conceived before and after a nearby oil spill, to identify a causal effect.  The results show that nearby oil spills that occur before conception increase neonatal mortality by 38.3 deaths per 1,000 live births, which corresponds to an increase of around 100% on the sample mean. 

Bruederle, A. and R. Hodler. 2019. Effect of oil spills on infant mortality in Nigeria. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences: 201818303

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1818303116
Journal Article
Year: 2019

Integrating Environmental Context into DHS Analysis While Protecting Participant Confidentiality: A New Remote Sensing Method

This article aimed to address the strategies commonly used by researchers who use the DHS use a variety of approaches for spatial data merging, and proposes a theory‐based and straightforward alternative for adding contextual environmental variables to survey data that maintains confidentiality of those surveyed.

Grace, K., et al. 2019. Integrating Environmental Context into DHS Analysis While Protecting Participant Confidentiality: A New Remote Sensing Method. Population and Development Review 45(1): 197-218.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/padr.12222
Journal Article
Year: 2019

Malthus, forever? (Malthus, toujours d’actualité ?)

Malthus is long dead, but his ideas live on and are still widely debated today. The author argues that Malthus was probably right, after all.

Massimo Livi Bacci. 2019. Malthus, forever? (Malthus, toujours d’actualité ?). Published on N-IUSSP.ORG February 4, 2019

Popular Article
Year: 2019

Migration as a human affair: Integrating individual stress thresholds into quantitative models of climate migration

The authors used coastal Bangladesh as case study, and extracted data from a seasonal 1500-household survey to generate a mobility index for households living in five coastal villages on the highly-exposed southwest coast.

Adams, H. and S. Kay.  2019. Migration as a human affair: Integrating individual stress thresholds into quantitative models of climate migration. Environmental Science & Policy 93: 129-138

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envsci.2018.10.015
Journal Article
Year: 2019

Leveraging endogenous climate resilience: urban adaptation in Pacific Small Island Developing States

Findings from community consultations across 16 communities within the settings of two ongoing participatory action research projects conducted by UN-Habitat and research partners from Australian universities in Honiara, Solomon Islands, and Port Vila, Vanuatu, demonstrate the critical role of endogenous modes of resilience, as well as the strong correlation between these spaces and sub-city climate vulnerability.

Trundle, A., et al.  2019. Leveraging endogenous climate resilience: urban adaptation in Pacific Small Island Developing States. Environment and Urbanization, DOI: 10.1177/0956247818816654

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1177/0956247818816654
Journal Article
Year: 2019

Research Project Database

The Research Project Database is a searchable listing of applied urban climate research projects. Projects are typically added by practitioners who seek the services of researchers. On the other hand, researchers can look through the database to find practitioners in need of their particular skill sets. Students can also use the database to search for thesis, term paper, or other applied term paper projects.

Research Project Database. Urban Climate Change Research Network – North American Hub.

Research Project
Year: 2019

Gendered space and climate resilience in informal settlements in Khulna City, Bangladesh

In this paper, a qualitative study exploring conditions of the urban poor in Khulna, Bangladesh, argues that gendered constraints in both inhabiting and shaping spaces is an underlying cause of differential climate resilience; alternatively, planning climate-resilient spaces can be seen as a fundamental change contributing to transformative adaptation.

Jabeen, H. 2019. Gendered space and climate resilience in informal settlements in Khulna City, Bangladesh. Environment and Urbanization, DOI: 10.1177/0956247819828274

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1177/0956247819828274
Journal Article
Year: 2019

Aging Human Populations: Good for Us, Good for the Earth

The article clarifies the many environmental benefits of smaller populations, concluding that reversing population growth would abate species extinctions, avoid overconsumption of fresh water and many other resources, and mitigate climate change by lowering greenhouse gas emissions.

Götmark, F., et al.  2018. Aging Human Populations: Good for Us, Good for the Earth. Trends in Ecology & Evolution 33(11): 851-862

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2018.08.015
Journal Article
Year: 2019

Climate Plan Clearinghouse

This page is one-stop shopping for climate plans across the continent. Eventually, users will be able to conduct word-string and/or keyword searches of the plans, enabling efficient queries for different climate risks (e.g. urban heat islands) or discreet adaptation and/or mitigation measures (e.g. living shorelines). Currently, users can download plans that have already been uploaded by the Hub administrator.

Climate Plan Clearinghouse. Urban Climate Change Research Network – North American Hub

Educational Resource
Year: 2019

Vulnerability of informal settlements in the context of rapid urbanization and climate change

This paper aims to contribute to broader theoretical knowledge on urban vulnerability and resilience in the face of climate change and rapid urbanization, by applying participatory modelling techniques to a particular case study of an informal settlement in Durban, South Africa.

Williams, D. S., et al. 2019.  Vulnerability of informal settlements in the context of rapid urbanization and climate change. Environment and Urbanization, https://doi.org/10.1177/0956247818819694

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1177/0956247818819694
Journal Article
Year: 2019

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