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The Overpopulation Project

Over the past two centuries Earth’s human population has doubled, and doubled again, and nearly doubled yet again, increasing from 1 billion to over 7.6 billion people. This huge increase is at the root of grave global environmental problems, from climate change to mass species extinction. With help from a generous grant from the Global Challenges Foundation, The Overpopulation Project studies the environmental impacts of overpopulation and explores humane policies to end population growth around the world.

The Overpopulation Project. Urban Climate Change Research Network – North American Hub

Research Project
Year: 2019

Four compelling reasons to fear population growth (Quatre raisons de craindre la croissance démographique)

The author details four specific threats to human survival (or, at least, quality of survival) that are directly linked to population growth.

Massimo Livi Bacci. 2019. Four compelling reasons to fear population growth (Quatre raisons de craindre la croissance démographique). Published on N-IUSSP.ORG February 11, 2019

Popular Article
Year: 2019

Integrating Environmental Context into DHS Analysis While Protecting Participant Confidentiality: A New Remote Sensing Method

This article aimed to address the strategies commonly used by researchers who use the DHS use a variety of approaches for spatial data merging, and proposes a theory‐based and straightforward alternative for adding contextual environmental variables to survey data that maintains confidentiality of those surveyed.

Grace, K., et al. 2019. Integrating Environmental Context into DHS Analysis While Protecting Participant Confidentiality: A New Remote Sensing Method. Population and Development Review 45(1): 197-218.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/padr.12222
Journal Article
Year: 2019

Climate Change and Cities

The Urban Climate Change Research Network’s Second Assessment Report on Climate Change in Cities (ARC3.2) is the second in a series of global, science–based reports to examine climate risk, adaptation, and mitigation efforts in cities. The book explicitly seeks to explore the implications of changing climatic conditions on critical urban physical and social infrastructure sectors and intersectoral concerns. The primary purpose of ARC3.2 is to inform the development and implementation of effective urban climate change policies, leveraging ongoing and planned investments for populations in cities of developing, emerging, and developed countries. This volume, like its predecessor, will be invaluable for a range of audiences involved with climate change and cities: mayors, city officials and policymakers; urban planners; policymakers charged with developing climate change mitigation and adaptation programs; and a broad spectrum of researchers and advanced students in the environmental sciences.  (http://uccrn.org/what-we-do/arc3-report/upcoming-arc3-2/)

Cynthia Rosenzweig, William D. Solecki, Patricia Romero-Lankao, Shagun Mehrotra, Shobhakar Dhakal, Somayya Ali Ibrahim (Edsitors). 2019. Climate Change and Cities. Cambridge University Press, University Printing House, Cambridge CB2 8BS, United Kingdom. ISBN: 9781316603338

Book
Year: 2019

Gendered space and climate resilience in informal settlements in Khulna City, Bangladesh

In this paper, a qualitative study exploring conditions of the urban poor in Khulna, Bangladesh, argues that gendered constraints in both inhabiting and shaping spaces is an underlying cause of differential climate resilience; alternatively, planning climate-resilient spaces can be seen as a fundamental change contributing to transformative adaptation.

Jabeen, H. 2019. Gendered space and climate resilience in informal settlements in Khulna City, Bangladesh. Environment and Urbanization, DOI: 10.1177/0956247819828274

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1177/0956247819828274
Journal Article
Year: 2019

Migration as a human affair: Integrating individual stress thresholds into quantitative models of climate migration

The authors used coastal Bangladesh as case study, and extracted data from a seasonal 1500-household survey to generate a mobility index for households living in five coastal villages on the highly-exposed southwest coast.

Adams, H. and S. Kay.  2019. Migration as a human affair: Integrating individual stress thresholds into quantitative models of climate migration. Environmental Science & Policy 93: 129-138

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envsci.2018.10.015
Journal Article
Year: 2019

Informing notions of climate change adaptation: a case study of everyday gendered realities of climate change adaptation in an informal settlement in Dar es Salaam

In this paper, evidence from a small-scale case study of a flood-prone informal settlement in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania was presented to examines the gendered dynamics of climate change adaptation in a rapidly urbanizing area of the global South.

Schofield, D. and F. Gubbels. 2019. Informing notions of climate change adaptation: a case study of everyday gendered realities of climate change adaptation in an informal settlement in Dar es Salaam. Environment and Urbanization, DOI: 10.1177/0956247819830074

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1177/0956247819830074
Journal Article
Year: 2019

Does climate matter? An empirical study of interregional migration in China

The authors developed a robust empirical approach based on a correlated random effects model and a prefecture‐level panel dataset which allows to account for both within province migration flows and prefecture‐specific characteristics, to study the role of local climate conditions in spurring interregional migration in China over the period 2000 to 2010.

Gao, L. and A. G. Sam. 2019. Does climate matter? An empirical study of interregional migration in China. Papers in Regional Science 98(1): 477-496

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/pirs.12335
Journal Article
Year: 2019

Vulnerability of informal settlements in the context of rapid urbanization and climate change

This paper aims to contribute to broader theoretical knowledge on urban vulnerability and resilience in the face of climate change and rapid urbanization, by applying participatory modelling techniques to a particular case study of an informal settlement in Durban, South Africa.

Williams, D. S., et al. 2019.  Vulnerability of informal settlements in the context of rapid urbanization and climate change. Environment and Urbanization, https://doi.org/10.1177/0956247818819694

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1177/0956247818819694
Journal Article
Year: 2019

Effect of oil spills on infant mortality in Nigeria

The authors study how onshore oil spills affect neonatal and infant mortality by combining spatial data from the Nigerian Oil Spill Monitor with Demographic and Health Surveys. They compare siblings born to the same mother, conceived before and after a nearby oil spill, to identify a causal effect.  The results show that nearby oil spills that occur before conception increase neonatal mortality by 38.3 deaths per 1,000 live births, which corresponds to an increase of around 100% on the sample mean. 

Bruederle, A. and R. Hodler. 2019. Effect of oil spills on infant mortality in Nigeria. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences: 201818303

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1818303116
Journal Article
Year: 2019

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