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Migration as adaptation strategy to cope with climate change: A study of farmers’ migration in rural India

In Bihar, India, an evaluation of the role of migration as an adaptation strategy to cope with climate change shows that a climate-induced livelihood risk is the major driver of farmer migration for both seasons: July to October and October to March.

Kumar, J. C., et al. 2018. Migration as adaptation strategy to cope with climate change: A study of farmers’ migration in rural India. International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management 10(1): 121-141

DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1108/IJCCSM-03-2017-0059
Journal Article
Year: 2018

Does climate matter? An empirical study of interregional migration in China

Using a robust empirical approach based on a correlated random effects model and a prefecture-level panel dataset, the study focuses on the role of local climate conditions in spurring interregional migration in China over the period 2000 to 2010.

Gao, L. and A. G. Sam. Does climate matter? An empirical study of interregional migration in China. Papers in Regional Science, https://doi.org/10.1111/pirs.12335

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/pirs.12335
Journal Article
Year: 2018

The Climate and Migration Coalition

The Climate and Migration Coalition is led by Climate Outreach, a charitable company.  The coalition provides a newsletter with well balanced material on issues around climate change and migration. The organization’s goal is to ensure a people centered policy response at the national and international level by:

•    Building support for policies that allow people to strengthen their survival capacity through migration
•    Ensuring adequate assistance and protection for people displaced internally and across borders as a consequence of slow and sudden onset disasters

The Climate and Migration Coalition

Research Program or Institution
Year: 2018

Water stress and human migration: a global, georeferenced review of empirical research

This report assesses and maps 184 peer-reviewed, empirical research articles selected for their focus on linkages between water stress and human migration. First and most importantly, this literature asserts that migration is universal. Migration is an extremely common social process and is normal in almost every society on earth. Moreover, migration is not a pathological response to environmental change. Environment- influenced migration is rarely (if ever) a resource threat to the regions to which people move. The literature does, however, observe that negative social outcomes can result from narratives that stigmatize migrants and/or cast migrants as a security threat – especially when these narratives are used to justify increased surveillance and monitoring of these people.

Wrathall, David J.; Van Den Hoek, Jamon; Walters, Alex; Devenish, Alan. 2018. Water stress and human migration: a global, georeferenced review of empirical research. FAO Land and Water Discussion Paper 11.

Report
Year: 2018

Gender and Adaptation to Climate Change: Perspectives from a Pastoral Community in Gujarat, India

In this paper, the authors examine the socially situated perspective of women in the Maldhari pastoral community in Gujarat, Western India. Results show that climate adaptation pathways traditionally utilized by the Maldharis are constrained by the institutional, policy and social context in which the community is placed, with specific impacts on women. This limitation to traditional adaptation pathways in the face of climate vulnerability triggers coping responses for survival, livelihoods and food security, which produce gendered burdens especially in terms of women's work.

Venkatasubramanian, K. and S. Ramnarain.  Gender and Adaptation to Climate Change: Perspectives from a Pastoral Community in Gujarat, India. Development and Change, DOI: 10.1111/dech.12448

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/dech.12448
Journal Article
Year: 2018

Identifying the relationship between urban land expansion and human activities in the Yangtze River Economic Belt, China

Using Landsat and nighttime light remote sensing data of the Yangtze River Economic Belt (the YREB) of China during the period of 1995–2015, ore, this paper explores the relationship between urban land expansion and the scope of human activities. 

Liu, Y., et al. 2018. Identifying the relationship between urban land expansion and human activities in the Yangtze River Economic Belt, China. Applied Geography 94: 163-177

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apgeog.2018.03.016
Journal Article
Year: 2018

Structuring the emotional landscape of climate change migration: Towards climate mobilities in geography

Aiming to resolve the disjuncture between ‘objective’ and subjective accounts of the environment, this paper uses the case of a Cambodian beggar to show how recent developments across three fields have laid the groundwork for the structural and emotional dimensions of climate change response to be engaged with under a coherent theoretical rubric.

Parsons, L.  2018. Structuring the emotional landscape of climate change migration: Towards climate mobilities in geography. Progress in Human Geography, DOI: 10.1177/0309132518781011.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1177/0309132518781011
Journal Article
Year: 2018

Climate Change and Gender in Rich Countries: Work, Public Policy, and Action

Climate Change and Gender in Rich Countries covers a wide range of issues dealing with work and working life. The book demonstrates the gendered distinctions in both experiences of climate change and the ways that public policy deals with it. The book draws on case studies from the UK, Sweden, Australia, Canada, Spain and the US to address key issues such as: how gendered distinctions affect the most vulnerable; paid and unpaid work; and activism on climate change. It is argued that including gender as part of the analysis will lead to more equitable and stronger societies as solutions to climate change advance. (from Phttps://www.routledge.com/Climate-Change-and-Gender-in-Rich-Countries-Wo...)

Marjorie Griffin Cohen (Editor). 2017. Climate Change and Gender in Rich Countries: Work, Public Policy, and Action. Routledge, New York, 2017, 322 pp., paper $42.95 (ISBN 978-1138222403).

Book
Year: 2018

Who takes responsibility for the climate refugees?

In this paper, the author proposes a innovative method for undertaking the responsibility for climate refugees literally uprooted by liable climate polluting countries.

Bayes, A. 2018. Who takes responsibility for the climate refugees? International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management 10(1): 5-26.

DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1108/IJCCSM-10-2016-0149
Journal Article
Year: 2018

Social protection as a strategy to address climate-induced migration

This paper aims to discuss the roles of social protection and identify key characteristics of social protection schemes which could effectively address climate-induced migration and attempts to derive recommendations for policy design.

Susanne, S. and Y. Xiaohua. 2018. Social protection as a strategy to address climate-induced migration. International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management 10(1): 43-64

DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1108/IJCCSM-01-2017-0019
Journal Article
Year: 2018

Pages