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Informing notions of climate change adaptation: a case study of everyday gendered realities of climate change adaptation in an informal settlement in Dar es Salaam

In this paper, evidence from a small-scale case study of a flood-prone informal settlement in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania was presented to examines the gendered dynamics of climate change adaptation in a rapidly urbanizing area of the global South.

Schofield, D. and F. Gubbels. 2019. Informing notions of climate change adaptation: a case study of everyday gendered realities of climate change adaptation in an informal settlement in Dar es Salaam. Environment and Urbanization, DOI: 10.1177/0956247819830074

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1177/0956247819830074
Journal Article
Year: 2019

Gravity of human impacts mediates coral reef conservation gains

The study found that only marine reserves in areas of low human impact consistently sustained top predators.

Cinner, J. E., et al. 2018. Gravity of human impacts mediates coral reef conservation gains. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 115(27): E6116-E6125.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1708001115
Journal Article
Year: 2018

The impact of natural disasters on children's education: Comparative evidence from Ethiopia, India, Peru, and Vietnam

Using a Young Lives data set and child fixed‐effects regression, The study finds a differential impact of different types of natural disasters on education and cognitive ability of children aged 12 to 15 years in Ethiopia, India, Peru, and Vietnam.

Viet, N. C. and M. P. Nguyet  The impact of natural disasters on children's education: Comparative evidence from Ethiopia, India, Peru, and Vietnam. Review of Development Economics, DOI: doi:10.1111/rode.12406

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/rode.12406
Journal Article
Year: 2018

Gender and Adaptation to Climate Change: Perspectives from a Pastoral Community in Gujarat, India

In this paper, the authors examine the socially situated perspective of women in the Maldhari pastoral community in Gujarat, Western India. Results show that climate adaptation pathways traditionally utilized by the Maldharis are constrained by the institutional, policy and social context in which the community is placed, with specific impacts on women. This limitation to traditional adaptation pathways in the face of climate vulnerability triggers coping responses for survival, livelihoods and food security, which produce gendered burdens especially in terms of women's work.

Venkatasubramanian, K. and S. Ramnarain.  Gender and Adaptation to Climate Change: Perspectives from a Pastoral Community in Gujarat, India. Development and Change, DOI: 10.1111/dech.12448

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/dech.12448
Journal Article
Year: 2018

Does climate matter? An empirical study of interregional migration in China

Using a robust empirical approach based on a correlated random effects model and a prefecture-level panel dataset, the study focuses on the role of local climate conditions in spurring interregional migration in China over the period 2000 to 2010.

Gao, L. and A. G. Sam. Does climate matter? An empirical study of interregional migration in China. Papers in Regional Science, https://doi.org/10.1111/pirs.12335

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/pirs.12335
Journal Article
Year: 2018

Spatio-temporal analysis on built-up land expansion and population growth in the Yangtze River Delta Region, China: From a coordination perspective

The study used the ratio of the land expansion rate to the population growth rate as coordination degree to identify the trend of the “land-population” coordination with the case study of the Yangtze River Delta Region, China by means of spatial analysis and regression.


Luo, J., et al. 2018. Spatio-temporal analysis on built-up land expansion and population growth in the Yangtze River Delta Region, China: From a coordination perspective. Applied Geography 96: 98-108.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apgeog.2018.05.012
Journal Article
Year: 2018

Water stress and human migration: a global, georeferenced review of empirical research

This report assesses and maps 184 peer-reviewed, empirical research articles selected for their focus on linkages between water stress and human migration. First and most importantly, this literature asserts that migration is universal. Migration is an extremely common social process and is normal in almost every society on earth. Moreover, migration is not a pathological response to environmental change. Environment- influenced migration is rarely (if ever) a resource threat to the regions to which people move. The literature does, however, observe that negative social outcomes can result from narratives that stigmatize migrants and/or cast migrants as a security threat – especially when these narratives are used to justify increased surveillance and monitoring of these people.

Wrathall, David J.; Van Den Hoek, Jamon; Walters, Alex; Devenish, Alan. 2018. Water stress and human migration: a global, georeferenced review of empirical research. FAO Land and Water Discussion Paper 11.

Report
Year: 2018

Human mobility in the context of climate change and disasters: a South American approach

This paper shows that in South American states, human mobility in the context of disasters and climate change endangers the lives of millions of people and their livelihoods and reveals that disasters are triggers of displacement and affect human mobility.

Lilian, Y., et al. 2018. Human mobility in the context of climate change and disasters: a South American approach. International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management 10(1): 65-85.

DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1108/IJCCSM-03-2017-0069
Journal Article
Year: 2018

Thinking about the future: the four billion question (Penser à l'avenir: la question des quatre milliards)

In this article, the author claims that with four billion extra inhabitants on our planet in the next century constitute a serious threat to survival, greater than most observers acknowledge. He argues that greater international cooperation is needed both to achieve the goal of curbing demographic growth and to manage the already scarce resources of our planet.

Llivi-Bacci, Massimo. Thinking about the future: the four billion question (Penser à l'avenir: la question des quatre milliards).  N-IUSSP.ORG February 12, 2018.

Year: 2018

Climate change, human impacts, and carbon sequestration in China

This paper explores the impacts of climate change and human activities on the structure and functioning of ecosystems, with emphasis on quantifying the magnitude and distribution of carbon (C) pools and C sequestration in China’s terrestrial ecosystems.

Fang, J., et al. 2018. Climate change, human impacts, and carbon sequestration in China. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 115(16): 4015-4020

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1700304115
Journal Article
Year: 2018

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