eLibrary page

Displaying 61 - 70 of 2560

Emplaced social vulnerability to technological disasters: Southeast Louisiana and the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill

Through joint analysis of data from Community Oil Spill Survey and US Census Bureau products, a place-based index of social vulnerability is developed to examine the relationship between emplaced social vulnerability and impacts on mental health following the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

Cope, M. R. and T. Slack. 2017. Emplaced social vulnerability to technological disasters: Southeast Louisiana and the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Population and Environment 38(3): 217-241.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11111-016-0257-8
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Gender and the management of climate-related risks in Northern Thailand

Results form this study show that when strengthening climate risk management practices or designing adaptation interventions, gender should be taken into account as it can influence risk-taking and decision-making.

Lebel, L., P. Lebel and B. Lebel. 2017. Gender and the management of climate-related risks in Northern Thailand. International Social Science Journal, DOI: 10.1111/issj.12090

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/issj.12090
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Climate change and forced migrations: An effort towards recognizing climate refugees

This article analyzes how the international community is dealing with the concept of climate change refugees, an emergent and undeniable reality.

Berchin, I. I., I. B. Valduga, J. Garcia and J. B. S. O. de Andrade Guerra. 2017. Climate change and forced migrations: An effort towards recognizing climate refugees. Geoforum 84(Supplement C): 147-150.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.geoforum.2017.06.022
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Talking About the Weather in Chiapas, Mexico: Rural Women's Approaches to Climate Change Adaptation

Drawing on interviews and ethnographic field work with women in 2 local development organizations in San Cristóbal de las Casas, Chiapas, México undertaken over 8 weeks in 2014 and 2015, this paper explores how place-based approaches to climate change adaptation and mitigation interact with processes and ideas operating at national and global scales.

Lookabaugh, L. 2017. Talking About the Weather in Chiapas, Mexico: Rural Women's Approaches to Climate Change Adaptation. The Latin Americanist 61(1): 61-80.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tla.12101
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Climate shocks and rural-urban migration in Mexico: exploring nonlinearities and thresholds

To investigate the relationship between climate shocks and migration between rural and urban areas within Mexico, individual records from the 2000 and 2010 Mexican censuses (n = 683,518) were combined with high-resolution climate data from Terra Populus that are linked to census data at the municipality level (n = 2321). Then climate shocks were measured as monthly deviation from a 30-year (1961–1990) long-term climate normal period, and uncover important nonlinearities using quadratic and cubic specifications.

Nawrotzki, R. J., J. DeWaard, M. Bakhtsiyarava and J. T. Ha. 2017. Climate shocks and rural-urban migration in Mexico: exploring nonlinearities and thresholds. Climatic Change 140(2): 243-258.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10584-016-1849-0
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Climate-induced migration: Exploring local perspectives in Kiribati

The study using a questionnaire (n = 60) as the primary method of data collection, explores  how local community members have taken it upon themselves to respond to the impacts of climate change by utilizing a number of different strategies. The results show that: first, respondents consider climate change to be the most concerning issue for sustaining their livelihoods; second, respondents have built physical defences, relocated temporarily or permanently, and sought government assistance to adapt to localized climate-related impacts; and third, the majority of respondents indicated that they would migrate as a long term strategy to respond to the future impacts of climate change.

Allgood, L. and K. E. McNamara. 2017. Climate-induced migration: Exploring local perspectives in Kiribati. Singapore Journal of Tropical Geography 38(3): 370-385.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/sjtg.12202
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Disruption, not displacement: Environmental variability and temporary migration in Bangladesh

Using high-frequency demographic surveillance data, a discrete time event history approach, and a range of sociodemographic and contextual controls, the study measures the extent to which temperature, precipitation, and flooding can predict temporary migration.

Call, M. A., C. Gray, M. Yunus and M. Emch. 2017. Disruption, not displacement: Environmental variability and temporary migration in Bangladesh.  Global Environmental Change 46(Supplement C): 157-165.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2017.08.008
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Household agricultural activities and child growth: evidence from rural Timor-Leste

The study investigated the links between household agricultural activities and children's physical growth in two agro-ecologically varying field sites: lowland Natarbora and mountainous Ossu in order to redress a lack of research that clearly demonstrates how agriculture impacts on nutrition in Timor-Leste.

Thu, P. M. and D. S. Judge. 2017. Household agricultural activities and child growth: evidence from rural Timor-Leste. Geographical Research, DOI: 10.1111/1745-5871.12221

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1745-5871.12221
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Adaptive migration: pluralising the debate on climate change and migration

In this paper, the multi-dimensional relationship between climate change and migration was explored as well as new perspectives and concepts to interpret the emerging theory of adaptive migration was advanced, through the use of the concept of pluralism.

Baldwin, A. and E. Fornalé. 2017. Adaptive migration: pluralising the debate on climate change and migration. The Geographical Journal 183(4): 322-328.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/geoj.12242
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Exploring short-term and long-term time frames in Australian population carrying capacity assessment

The author developed an Australian-orientated model, the Carrying Capacity Dashboard to explore temporal flexibility in resource-based carrying capacity modelling. The model offers users the ability to choose projected time frames of between one and 150 years for a variety of landscape scales and consumption patterns.

Lane, M. 2017. Exploring short-term and long-term time frames in Australian population carrying capacity assessment. Population and Environment 38(3): 309-324.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11111-016-0264-9
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Pages