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Climate Change and Gender in Rich Countries: Work, Public Policy, and Action

Climate Change and Gender in Rich Countries covers a wide range of issues dealing with work and working life. The book demonstrates the gendered distinctions in both experiences of climate change and the ways that public policy deals with it. The book draws on case studies from the UK, Sweden, Australia, Canada, Spain and the US to address key issues such as: how gendered distinctions affect the most vulnerable; paid and unpaid work; and activism on climate change. It is argued that including gender as part of the analysis will lead to more equitable and stronger societies as solutions to climate change advance. (from Phttps://www.routledge.com/Climate-Change-and-Gender-in-Rich-Countries-Wo...)

Marjorie Griffin Cohen (Editor). 2017. Climate Change and Gender in Rich Countries: Work, Public Policy, and Action. Routledge, New York, 2017, 322 pp., paper $42.95 (ISBN 978-1138222403).

Book
Year: 2018

Le dividende démographique en Afrique Premiers signes et estimation par la méthode de décomposition

L’amorce d’une transition Démographique en Afrique relance aujourd’hui le débat sur les  liens  entre  population  et  développement.  Pour  l’essentiel,  ce  nouveau  débat  s’est  cristallisé autour de la perspective d’un dividende démographique. Contrairement aux thèses malthusiennes axées sur les effets d’une forte croissance démographique, ce nouvel argument invoque la structure par âge des populations. La question dans ce contexte reste de savoir si les pays africains tireront parti des transitions démographiques en cours pour accélérer leur développement socioéconomique à l’instar des Tigres asiatiques. 

Le dividende démographique en Afrique Premiers signes et estimation par la méthode de décomposition. IUSSP.

Report
Year: 2018

Gender and Adaptation to Climate Change: Perspectives from a Pastoral Community in Gujarat, India

In this paper, the authors examine the socially situated perspective of women in the Maldhari pastoral community in Gujarat, Western India. Results show that climate adaptation pathways traditionally utilized by the Maldharis are constrained by the institutional, policy and social context in which the community is placed, with specific impacts on women. This limitation to traditional adaptation pathways in the face of climate vulnerability triggers coping responses for survival, livelihoods and food security, which produce gendered burdens especially in terms of women's work.

Venkatasubramanian, K. and S. Ramnarain.  Gender and Adaptation to Climate Change: Perspectives from a Pastoral Community in Gujarat, India. Development and Change, DOI: 10.1111/dech.12448

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/dech.12448
Journal Article
Year: 2018

Structuring the emotional landscape of climate change migration: Towards climate mobilities in geography

Aiming to resolve the disjuncture between ‘objective’ and subjective accounts of the environment, this paper uses the case of a Cambodian beggar to show how recent developments across three fields have laid the groundwork for the structural and emotional dimensions of climate change response to be engaged with under a coherent theoretical rubric.

Parsons, L.  2018. Structuring the emotional landscape of climate change migration: Towards climate mobilities in geography. Progress in Human Geography, DOI: 10.1177/0309132518781011.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1177/0309132518781011
Journal Article
Year: 2018

Social protection as a strategy to address climate-induced migration

This paper aims to discuss the roles of social protection and identify key characteristics of social protection schemes which could effectively address climate-induced migration and attempts to derive recommendations for policy design.

Susanne, S. and Y. Xiaohua. 2018. Social protection as a strategy to address climate-induced migration. International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management 10(1): 43-64

DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1108/IJCCSM-01-2017-0019
Journal Article
Year: 2018

The Climate and Migration Coalition

The Climate and Migration Coalition is led by Climate Outreach, a charitable company.  The coalition provides a newsletter with well balanced material on issues around climate change and migration. The organization’s goal is to ensure a people centered policy response at the national and international level by:

•    Building support for policies that allow people to strengthen their survival capacity through migration
•    Ensuring adequate assistance and protection for people displaced internally and across borders as a consequence of slow and sudden onset disasters

The Climate and Migration Coalition

Research Program or Institution
Year: 2018

Global population, development aspirations and fallacies (Population mondiale, aspirations de développement et logiques fallacieuses)

The world is on an unsustainable path of growth. Technology and earlier fertility decline are critical for longer-term environmental purposes but will not resolve the immediate social or environmental crises. For George Martine, a redefinition of “development” and a radically different use of scarce global resources are the most pressing issues to be addressed.

Martine, George. Global population, development aspirations and fallacies (Population mondiale, aspirations de développement et logiques fallacieuses). N-IUSSP.ORG February 5, 2018.

Year: 2018

Incorporating Environmental and Natural Resources within Analyses of Multidimensional Poverty

How can multidimensional poverty measures that currently encompass social and economic dimensions be extended to include environmental deprivations that strike the poor simultaneously?  And can such extended measures better inform effective and integrated policy responses?  Research on joint Environmental and Natural Resources (ENR) and poverty issues is rich, and has contributed to bringing the  poverty-environment nexus to the fore.  Yet, no widely used multidimensional poverty measure identifies who and how the  socio-economically poor people are affected by ENR issues, at a large enough scale, and in ways that can respond to and inform public policies over the medium term.  This paper sets out how such a measure could be built.  In particular, it sets out how to include indicators of ENR deprivations into the profile of the joint deprivations people experience.  These deprivation profiles could then be used to compute multidimensional measures using the Alkire Foster (AF) methodology, with the difference that these would now encompass a subset of pertinent ENR deprivations. The paper clarifies the ENR data requirements for developing and analysing such a measure empirically.

Thiry, Géraldine; Alkire, Sabina; Schleicher, Judith. 2018.  Incorporating Environmental and Natural Resources within Analyses of Multidimensional Poverty. OPHI RESEARCH IN PROGRESS SERIES 50a. Oxford Poverty & Human Development Initiative (OPHI), Oxford Department of International Development, Queen Elizabeth House (QEH), University of Oxford

Monograph
Year: 2018

Low-Carbon Gentrification: When Climate Change Encounters Residential Displacement

This article focuses on the emergence of ‘low‐carbon’ gentrification as a distinct urban phenomenon.  It develops a conceptual framework for scrutinizing low‐carbon gentrification, predicated upon insights from literatures on ecological gentrification and displacement.

Stefan, B., et al. Low-Carbon Gentrification: When Climate Change Encounters Residential Displacement. International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, DOI:10.1111/1468-2427.12634

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1468-2427.12634
Journal Article
Year: 2018

Environmental influences on skilled worker migration from Bangladesh to Canada

In this stidy, focus groups in Toronto with 44 recent skilled worker immigrants from Bangladesh, was conducted to explore whether their decisions to migrate to Canada may have been influenced by environmental problems.

McLeman, R., et al. 2018. Environmental influences on skilled worker migration from Bangladesh to Canada. The Canadian Geographer / Le Géographe canadien 62(3): 352-371.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/cag.12430
Journal Article
Year: 2018

Pages