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Water stress and human migration: a global, georeferenced review of empirical research

This report assesses and maps 184 peer-reviewed, empirical research articles selected for their focus on linkages between water stress and human migration. First and most importantly, this literature asserts that migration is universal. Migration is an extremely common social process and is normal in almost every society on earth. Moreover, migration is not a pathological response to environmental change. Environment- influenced migration is rarely (if ever) a resource threat to the regions to which people move. The literature does, however, observe that negative social outcomes can result from narratives that stigmatize migrants and/or cast migrants as a security threat – especially when these narratives are used to justify increased surveillance and monitoring of these people.

Wrathall, David J.; Van Den Hoek, Jamon; Walters, Alex; Devenish, Alan. 2018. Water stress and human migration: a global, georeferenced review of empirical research. FAO Land and Water Discussion Paper 11.

Report
Year: 2018

Global population, development aspirations and fallacies (Population mondiale, aspirations de développement et logiques fallacieuses)

The world is on an unsustainable path of growth. Technology and earlier fertility decline are critical for longer-term environmental purposes but will not resolve the immediate social or environmental crises. For George Martine, a redefinition of “development” and a radically different use of scarce global resources are the most pressing issues to be addressed.

Martine, George. Global population, development aspirations and fallacies (Population mondiale, aspirations de développement et logiques fallacieuses). N-IUSSP.ORG February 5, 2018.

Year: 2018

Gravity of human impacts mediates coral reef conservation gains

The study found that only marine reserves in areas of low human impact consistently sustained top predators.

Cinner, J. E., et al. 2018. Gravity of human impacts mediates coral reef conservation gains. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 115(27): E6116-E6125.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1708001115
Journal Article
Year: 2018

Climate change, human impacts, and carbon sequestration in China

This paper explores the impacts of climate change and human activities on the structure and functioning of ecosystems, with emphasis on quantifying the magnitude and distribution of carbon (C) pools and C sequestration in China’s terrestrial ecosystems.

Fang, J., et al. 2018. Climate change, human impacts, and carbon sequestration in China. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 115(16): 4015-4020

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1700304115
Journal Article
Year: 2018

Global estimates of mortality associated with long-term exposure to outdoor fine particulate matter

The estimates from this study are severalfold larger than previous calculations, suggesting that outdoor particulate air pollution is an even more important population health risk factor than previously thought.

Burnett, R., et al. 2018. Global estimates of mortality associated with long-term exposure to outdoor fine particulate matter. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 115(38): 9592-9597.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1803222115
Journal Article
Year: 2018

Unemployment, rural–urban migration and environmental regulation

When assessing the impact of environmental taxation to developing countries, the paper highlight the importance of modeling the features particular to, and the economic general equilibrium effects in those countries.

Karlygash, K. 2018. Unemployment, rural–urban migration and environmental regulation. Review of Development Economics 22(2): 507-539.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/rode.12360
Journal Article
Year: 2018

Urban land-use change: The role of strategic spatial planning

In this paper, the authors prsented a research agenda to further develop the understanding of these three components of spatial planning in urban development and their interconnections as well as their application in quantitative land-change modelling approaches for urban regions.

Hersperger, A. M., et al. 2018.  Urban land-use change: The role of strategic spatial planning. Global Environmental Change 51: 32-42.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2018.05.001
Journal Article
Year: 2018

Climate shocks and rural-urban migration in Mexico: exploring nonlinearities and thresholds

To investigate the relationship between climate shocks and migration between rural and urban areas within Mexico, individual records from the 2000 and 2010 Mexican censuses (n = 683,518) were combined with high-resolution climate data from Terra Populus that are linked to census data at the municipality level (n = 2321). Then climate shocks were measured as monthly deviation from a 30-year (1961–1990) long-term climate normal period, and uncover important nonlinearities using quadratic and cubic specifications.

Nawrotzki, R. J., J. DeWaard, M. Bakhtsiyarava and J. T. Ha. 2017. Climate shocks and rural-urban migration in Mexico: exploring nonlinearities and thresholds. Climatic Change 140(2): 243-258.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10584-016-1849-0
Journal Article
Year: 2017

How can migration serve adaptation to climate change? Challenges to fleshing out a policy ideal

This is a conceptual and methodological paper with the objective of identifying possible different options for research into the consequences of migration for adaptation.

Gemenne, F. and J. Blocher. 2017. How can migration serve adaptation to climate change? Challenges to fleshing out a policy ideal. The Geographical Journal, doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/geoj.12205

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/geoj.12205
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Climate and marriage in the Netherlands, 1871–1937

The study examines the effects of climate variability on marriage using longitudinal individual-level demographic data from the Historical Sample of the Netherlands (HSN) and climate and economic data from 1871 to 1937.

Jennings, J. A. and C. L. Gray. 2017. Climate and marriage in the Netherlands, 1871–1937. Population and Environment 38(3): 242-260.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11111-016-0266-7
Journal Article
Year: 2017

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