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Disruption, not displacement: Environmental variability and temporary migration in Bangladesh

Using high-frequency demographic surveillance data, a discrete time event history approach, and a range of sociodemographic and contextual controls, the study measures the extent to which temperature, precipitation, and flooding can predict temporary migration.

Call, M. A., C. Gray, M. Yunus and M. Emch. 2017. Disruption, not displacement: Environmental variability and temporary migration in Bangladesh.  Global Environmental Change 46(Supplement C): 157-165.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2017.08.008
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Environmental Change, Migration, and Conflict in Africa

This article examines how migration may act as an intervening and causal variable between environmental change and conflict by combining climate-conflict and environment-migration research. It argues that  to understand the potential propensity of environmental change to lead to conflict in Africa, close attention needs to be paid to local-level manifestations of conflict and (mal)adaptive forms of migration.

Freeman, L. 2017. Environmental Change, Migration, and Conflict in Africa. The Journal of Environment & Development, doi: 1070496517727325.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1177/1070496517727325
Journal Article
Year: 2017

A study of best practices in promoting sustainable urbanization in China

Data on 150 best sustainable practices in China were collected and stored in a new Sustainable Urbanization Practices Database (SUPD) where for each case, the category, the methods adopted and the outcomes achieved were identified, classified and coded by content analysis.

Tan, Y., H. Xu, L. Jiao, J. J. Ochoa and L. Shen. 2017. A study of best practices in promoting sustainable urbanization in China. Journal of Environmental Management 193: 8-18.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvman.2017.01.058
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Migration as an Adaptation Strategy for Atoll Island States

This is a discussion of the the possible solutions and protection alternatives for climate change displacement for the inhabitants of Small Islands Developing States (SIDS), and particularly of Atolls Islands States.

Yamamoto, L. and M. Esteban. 2017. Migration as an Adaptation Strategy for Atoll Island States. International Migration, DOI: 10.1111/imig.12318

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imig.12318
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Climate-induced migration: Exploring local perspectives in Kiribati

The study using a questionnaire (n = 60) as the primary method of data collection, explores  how local community members have taken it upon themselves to respond to the impacts of climate change by utilizing a number of different strategies. The results show that: first, respondents consider climate change to be the most concerning issue for sustaining their livelihoods; second, respondents have built physical defences, relocated temporarily or permanently, and sought government assistance to adapt to localized climate-related impacts; and third, the majority of respondents indicated that they would migrate as a long term strategy to respond to the future impacts of climate change.

Allgood, L. and K. E. McNamara. 2017. Climate-induced migration: Exploring local perspectives in Kiribati. Singapore Journal of Tropical Geography 38(3): 370-385.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/sjtg.12202
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Talking About the Weather in Chiapas, Mexico: Rural Women's Approaches to Climate Change Adaptation

Drawing on interviews and ethnographic field work with women in 2 local development organizations in San Cristóbal de las Casas, Chiapas, México undertaken over 8 weeks in 2014 and 2015, this paper explores how place-based approaches to climate change adaptation and mitigation interact with processes and ideas operating at national and global scales.

Lookabaugh, L. 2017. Talking About the Weather in Chiapas, Mexico: Rural Women's Approaches to Climate Change Adaptation. The Latin Americanist 61(1): 61-80.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tla.12101
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Climate change and forced migrations: An effort towards recognizing climate refugees

This article analyzes how the international community is dealing with the concept of climate change refugees, an emergent and undeniable reality.

Berchin, I. I., I. B. Valduga, J. Garcia and J. B. S. O. de Andrade Guerra. 2017. Climate change and forced migrations: An effort towards recognizing climate refugees. Geoforum 84(Supplement C): 147-150.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.geoforum.2017.06.022
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Population pressure and global markets drive a decade of forest cover change in Africa's Albertine Rift

The authors examined national socioeconomic, demographic, agricultural production, and local demographic and geographic variables to assessed multilevel forces driving local forest cover loss and gain outside protected areas during the first decade of this century by using satellite-derived estimates of forest cover change in Africa's Albertine Rift.

Ryan, S. J., M. W. Palace, J. Hartter, J. E. Diem, C. A. Chapman and J. Southworth. 2017. Population pressure and global markets drive a decade of forest cover change in Africa's Albertine Rift. Applied Geography 81: 52-59.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apgeog.2017.02.009
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Emplaced social vulnerability to technological disasters: Southeast Louisiana and the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill

Through joint analysis of data from Community Oil Spill Survey and US Census Bureau products, a place-based index of social vulnerability is developed to examine the relationship between emplaced social vulnerability and impacts on mental health following the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

Cope, M. R. and T. Slack. 2017. Emplaced social vulnerability to technological disasters: Southeast Louisiana and the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Population and Environment 38(3): 217-241.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11111-016-0257-8
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Exploring short-term and long-term time frames in Australian population carrying capacity assessment

The author developed an Australian-orientated model, the Carrying Capacity Dashboard to explore temporal flexibility in resource-based carrying capacity modelling. The model offers users the ability to choose projected time frames of between one and 150 years for a variety of landscape scales and consumption patterns.

Lane, M. 2017. Exploring short-term and long-term time frames in Australian population carrying capacity assessment. Population and Environment 38(3): 309-324.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11111-016-0264-9
Journal Article
Year: 2017

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