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The Climate and Migration Coalition

The Climate and Migration Coalition is led by Climate Outreach, a charitable company.  The coalition provides a newsletter with well balanced material on issues around climate change and migration. The organization’s goal is to ensure a people centered policy response at the national and international level by:

•    Building support for policies that allow people to strengthen their survival capacity through migration
•    Ensuring adequate assistance and protection for people displaced internally and across borders as a consequence of slow and sudden onset disasters

The Climate and Migration Coalition

Research Program or Institution
Year: 2018

Low-Carbon Gentrification: When Climate Change Encounters Residential Displacement

This article focuses on the emergence of ‘low‐carbon’ gentrification as a distinct urban phenomenon.  It develops a conceptual framework for scrutinizing low‐carbon gentrification, predicated upon insights from literatures on ecological gentrification and displacement.

Stefan, B., et al. Low-Carbon Gentrification: When Climate Change Encounters Residential Displacement. International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, DOI:10.1111/1468-2427.12634

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1468-2427.12634
Journal Article
Year: 2018

Health Disorder of Climate Migrants in Khulna City: An Urban Slum Perspective

In the last decade, the population in Khulna City, Bangladesh increased by more than 20 per cent due to migration from nearby climate vulnerable districts. This study explores the health disorders of climate migrants occupying the urban slums and squats of the city area.

Rahaman, M. A., et al. 2018. Health Disorder of Climate Migrants in Khulna City: An Urban Slum Perspective. International Migration 56(5): 42-55.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/imig.12460
Journal Article
Year: 2018

Does climate matter? An empirical study of interregional migration in China

The authosr developed a robust empirical approach based on a correlated random effects model and a prefecture‐level panel dataset which allows the study to account for both within province migration flows and prefecture‐specific characteristics, to study the role of local climate conditions in spurring interregional migration in China over the period 2000 to 2010.

Gao, L. and A. G. Sam. Does climate matter? An empirical study of interregional migration in China. Papers in Regional Science, DOI: 10.1111/pirs.12335

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/pirs.12335
Journal Article
Year: 2018

Climate change, human impacts, and carbon sequestration in China

This paper explores the impacts of climate change and human activities on the structure and functioning of ecosystems, with emphasis on quantifying the magnitude and distribution of carbon (C) pools and C sequestration in China’s terrestrial ecosystems.

Fang, J., et al. 2018. Climate change, human impacts, and carbon sequestration in China. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 115(16): 4015-4020

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1700304115
Journal Article
Year: 2018

Le dividende démographique en Afrique Premiers signes et estimation par la méthode de décomposition

L’amorce d’une transition Démographique en Afrique relance aujourd’hui le débat sur les  liens  entre  population  et  développement.  Pour  l’essentiel,  ce  nouveau  débat  s’est  cristallisé autour de la perspective d’un dividende démographique. Contrairement aux thèses malthusiennes axées sur les effets d’une forte croissance démographique, ce nouvel argument invoque la structure par âge des populations. La question dans ce contexte reste de savoir si les pays africains tireront parti des transitions démographiques en cours pour accélérer leur développement socioéconomique à l’instar des Tigres asiatiques. 

Le dividende démographique en Afrique Premiers signes et estimation par la méthode de décomposition. IUSSP.

Report
Year: 2018

Interannual variations in surface urban heat island intensity and associated drivers in China

For the period 2001–2015, the interannual variations in SUHI intensity (SUHII, derived from MODIS land surface temperature (LST) data (8-day composites of twice-daily observations), urban LST minus rural) and their relationships with climate variability and urbanization were analyzed in 31 cities in China.

Yao, R., et al. 2018. Interannual variations in surface urban heat island intensity and associated drivers in China. Journal of Environmental Management 222: 86-94.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvman.2018.05.024
Journal Article
Year: 2018

Thirty years of land use/cover change in the Caribbean: Assessing the relationship between urbanization and mangrove loss in Roatán, Honduras

The results of this research suggest decrease island ecosystem resiliency to environmental stressors and impaired sustainability of tourism development due to rapid urbanization and tourism development in the Caribbean.

Tuholske, C., Z. Tane, D. López-Carr, D. Roberts and S. Cassels. 2017. Thirty years of land use/cover change in the Caribbean: Assessing the relationship between urbanization and mangrove loss in Roatán, Honduras.  Applied Geography 88: 84-93.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apgeog.2017.08.018
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Remittance Incomes and Social Resilience among Migrant Households in Rural Bangladesh

In this book, the authors examine how migrant remittances contribute to household social resilience in rural Bangladesh using a mixed methods approach.

Sikder, Mohammad Jalal Uddin; Higgins, Vaughan; Ballis, Peter Harry. 2017. Remittance Incomes and Social Resilience among Migrant Households in Rural Bangladesh. Palgrave Macmillan US

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-57771-9
Book
Year: 2017

Syllabus: SOC 4312.Population and Environment

Course Syllabus.  This course focuses on the relationship between human population and the environment. Students will learn about diverse populations, recent dynamics of world population, their effects on the global environmental systems, and reciprocal effects of environment on population growth and spatial distribution. In order to understand the current patterns of population growth, students will study the history of human populations and how characteristics of humans led to increased abundance of resources and high population growth. The course will also include case studies of human groups/societies that thrived or disappeared when faced with specific environmental conditions.  Future changes in population and environmental conditions will be also studied so students will be able to understand and work with the idea of global, sustainable human society.

SOC 4312.Population and Environment. Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Social Work, texas Tech University

Educational Resource
Year: 2017

Pages