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Household agricultural activities and child growth: evidence from rural Timor-Leste

The study investigated the links between household agricultural activities and children's physical growth in two agro-ecologically varying field sites: lowland Natarbora and mountainous Ossu in order to redress a lack of research that clearly demonstrates how agriculture impacts on nutrition in Timor-Leste.

Thu, P. M. and D. S. Judge. 2017. Household agricultural activities and child growth: evidence from rural Timor-Leste. Geographical Research, DOI: 10.1111/1745-5871.12221

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1745-5871.12221
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Talking About the Weather in Chiapas, Mexico: Rural Women's Approaches to Climate Change Adaptation

Drawing on interviews and ethnographic field work with women in 2 local development organizations in San Cristóbal de las Casas, Chiapas, México undertaken over 8 weeks in 2014 and 2015, this paper explores how place-based approaches to climate change adaptation and mitigation interact with processes and ideas operating at national and global scales.

Lookabaugh, L. 2017. Talking About the Weather in Chiapas, Mexico: Rural Women's Approaches to Climate Change Adaptation. The Latin Americanist 61(1): 61-80.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tla.12101
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Holocene fluctuations in human population demonstrate repeated links to food production and climate

In this paper, the authors, via an archaeological radiocarbon date series of unprecedented sampling density and detail, consider the long-term relationship between human demography, food production, and Holocene climate.

Bevan, A., S. Colledge, D. Fuller, R. Fyfe, S. Shennan and C. Stevens. 2017. Holocene fluctuations in human population demonstrate repeated links to food production and climate. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 114(49): E10524-E10531.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1709190114
Journal Article
Year: 2017

High-resolution spatial assessment of population vulnerability to climate change in Nepal

The paper report that more than 60 percent of the population of Nepal falls in the moderate to high vulnerability categories with the lack of adaptive capacity as the biggest cause of population vulnerability to climate change in Nepal.

Mainali, J. and N. G. Pricope. 2017. High-resolution spatial assessment of population vulnerability to climate change in Nepal. Applied Geography 82: 66-82.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apgeog.2017.03.008
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Climate-induced migration: Exploring local perspectives in Kiribati

The study using a questionnaire (n = 60) as the primary method of data collection, explores  how local community members have taken it upon themselves to respond to the impacts of climate change by utilizing a number of different strategies. The results show that: first, respondents consider climate change to be the most concerning issue for sustaining their livelihoods; second, respondents have built physical defences, relocated temporarily or permanently, and sought government assistance to adapt to localized climate-related impacts; and third, the majority of respondents indicated that they would migrate as a long term strategy to respond to the future impacts of climate change.

Allgood, L. and K. E. McNamara. 2017. Climate-induced migration: Exploring local perspectives in Kiribati. Singapore Journal of Tropical Geography 38(3): 370-385.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/sjtg.12202
Journal Article
Year: 2017

A study of best practices in promoting sustainable urbanization in China

Data on 150 best sustainable practices in China were collected and stored in a new Sustainable Urbanization Practices Database (SUPD) where for each case, the category, the methods adopted and the outcomes achieved were identified, classified and coded by content analysis.

Tan, Y., H. Xu, L. Jiao, J. J. Ochoa and L. Shen. 2017. A study of best practices in promoting sustainable urbanization in China. Journal of Environmental Management 193: 8-18.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvman.2017.01.058
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Emplaced social vulnerability to technological disasters: Southeast Louisiana and the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill

Through joint analysis of data from Community Oil Spill Survey and US Census Bureau products, a place-based index of social vulnerability is developed to examine the relationship between emplaced social vulnerability and impacts on mental health following the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

Cope, M. R. and T. Slack. 2017. Emplaced social vulnerability to technological disasters: Southeast Louisiana and the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Population and Environment 38(3): 217-241.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11111-016-0257-8
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Climatic conditions and human mortality: spatial and regional variation in the United States

The study answers threee three research questions: (1) Are the effects of climatic conditions on mortality independent from those of social conditions? (2) If yes, do these climatic effects vary spatially in the US? (3) If there are spatial variations of climatic associations in the US, how are they distributed?

Yang, T.-C. and L. Jensen. 2017. Climatic conditions and human mortality: spatial and regional variation in the United States. Population and Environment 38(3): 261-285

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11111-016-0262-y
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Climate variability and migration in the Philippines

Using panel data, the study investigates the effects of climatic variations and extremes captured by variability in temperature, precipitation, and incidents of typhoons on aggregate inter-provincial migration within the Philippines.

Bohra-Mishra, P., M. Oppenheimer, R. Cai, S. Feng and R. Licker. 2017. Climate variability and migration in the Philippines. Population and Environment 38(3): 286-308

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11111-016-0263-x
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Adaptive migration: pluralising the debate on climate change and migration

In this paper, the multi-dimensional relationship between climate change and migration was explored as well as new perspectives and concepts to interpret the emerging theory of adaptive migration was advanced, through the use of the concept of pluralism.

Baldwin, A. and E. Fornalé. 2017. Adaptive migration: pluralising the debate on climate change and migration. The Geographical Journal 183(4): 322-328.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/geoj.12242
Journal Article
Year: 2017

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