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Communicating the deadly consequences of global warming for human heat stress

More of the Earth’s land surface could experience dangerous heat, and those regions already exposed could encounter such conditions more often, thus the study emphasize that the potentially deadly consequences of heat stress linked to global warming, even if limited to the 1.5 °C Paris target, should not be overlooked.

Matthews, T. K. R., R. L. Wilby and C. Murphy. 2017. Communicating the deadly consequences of global warming for human heat stress. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 114(15): 3861–3866.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1617526114
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Emplaced social vulnerability to technological disasters: Southeast Louisiana and the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill

Through joint analysis of data from Community Oil Spill Survey and US Census Bureau products, a place-based index of social vulnerability is developed to examine the relationship between emplaced social vulnerability and impacts on mental health following the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

Cope, M. R. and T. Slack. 2017. Emplaced social vulnerability to technological disasters: Southeast Louisiana and the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Population and Environment 38(3): 217-241.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11111-016-0257-8
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Gender and the management of climate-related risks in Northern Thailand

Results form this study show that when strengthening climate risk management practices or designing adaptation interventions, gender should be taken into account as it can influence risk-taking and decision-making.

Lebel, L., P. Lebel and B. Lebel. 2017. Gender and the management of climate-related risks in Northern Thailand. International Social Science Journal, DOI: 10.1111/issj.12090

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/issj.12090
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Climate change and forced migrations: An effort towards recognizing climate refugees

This article analyzes how the international community is dealing with the concept of climate change refugees, an emergent and undeniable reality.

Berchin, I. I., I. B. Valduga, J. Garcia and J. B. S. O. de Andrade Guerra. 2017. Climate change and forced migrations: An effort towards recognizing climate refugees. Geoforum 84(Supplement C): 147-150.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.geoforum.2017.06.022
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Climate shocks and rural-urban migration in Mexico: exploring nonlinearities and thresholds

To investigate the relationship between climate shocks and migration between rural and urban areas within Mexico, individual records from the 2000 and 2010 Mexican censuses (n = 683,518) were combined with high-resolution climate data from Terra Populus that are linked to census data at the municipality level (n = 2321). Then climate shocks were measured as monthly deviation from a 30-year (1961–1990) long-term climate normal period, and uncover important nonlinearities using quadratic and cubic specifications.

Nawrotzki, R. J., J. DeWaard, M. Bakhtsiyarava and J. T. Ha. 2017. Climate shocks and rural-urban migration in Mexico: exploring nonlinearities and thresholds. Climatic Change 140(2): 243-258.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10584-016-1849-0
Journal Article
Year: 2017

High-resolution spatial assessment of population vulnerability to climate change in Nepal

The paper report that more than 60 percent of the population of Nepal falls in the moderate to high vulnerability categories with the lack of adaptive capacity as the biggest cause of population vulnerability to climate change in Nepal.

Mainali, J. and N. G. Pricope. 2017. High-resolution spatial assessment of population vulnerability to climate change in Nepal. Applied Geography 82: 66-82.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apgeog.2017.03.008
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Exploring short-term and long-term time frames in Australian population carrying capacity assessment

The author developed an Australian-orientated model, the Carrying Capacity Dashboard to explore temporal flexibility in resource-based carrying capacity modelling. The model offers users the ability to choose projected time frames of between one and 150 years for a variety of landscape scales and consumption patterns.

Lane, M. 2017. Exploring short-term and long-term time frames in Australian population carrying capacity assessment. Population and Environment 38(3): 309-324.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11111-016-0264-9
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Environmental inequality and pollution advantage among immigrants in the United States

The authors combine sociodemographic information from the American Community Survey with toxicity-weighted chemical concentrations (Toxics Release Inventory) to model the relationship between toxin exposure and the relative population of recent immigrants across Public Use Microdata Areas (PUMAs, n = 2054) during 2005–2011 to investigate whether new international migrants in the U.S. are exposed to environmental hazards and how this pattern varies among immigrant subpopulations (e.g., Hispanics, Asian, European).

Bakhtsiyarava, M. and R. J. Nawrotzki. 2017. Environmental inequality and pollution advantage among immigrants in the United States. Applied Geography 81: 60-69.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apgeog.2017.02.013
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Talking About the Weather in Chiapas, Mexico: Rural Women's Approaches to Climate Change Adaptation

Drawing on interviews and ethnographic field work with women in 2 local development organizations in San Cristóbal de las Casas, Chiapas, México undertaken over 8 weeks in 2014 and 2015, this paper explores how place-based approaches to climate change adaptation and mitigation interact with processes and ideas operating at national and global scales.

Lookabaugh, L. 2017. Talking About the Weather in Chiapas, Mexico: Rural Women's Approaches to Climate Change Adaptation. The Latin Americanist 61(1): 61-80.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tla.12101
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Disruption, not displacement: Environmental variability and temporary migration in Bangladesh

Using high-frequency demographic surveillance data, a discrete time event history approach, and a range of sociodemographic and contextual controls, the study measures the extent to which temperature, precipitation, and flooding can predict temporary migration.

Call, M. A., C. Gray, M. Yunus and M. Emch. 2017. Disruption, not displacement: Environmental variability and temporary migration in Bangladesh.  Global Environmental Change 46(Supplement C): 157-165.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2017.08.008
Journal Article
Year: 2017

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