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E.g., 23 August 2019
E.g., 23 August 2019

Call for papers on Vulnerability & Risk Mapping - Sustainability special issue

Submission deadline: 30 November 2019

Measuring, analyzing, and mapping the societal risks and vulnerabilities of climate change has become part of the standard toolkit of climate risk and vulnerability assessments. This Special Issue focuses on the spatial assessment of climate risks and related vulnerabilities and the use of spatial data and analysis in field-based assessments. Papers may cover a range of spatial scales–from local to global–and represent any world region, and may be produced by authors from any discipline. The deadline for submission is 30 November 2019.

Papers must:

•    Define the problem space–that is, the system of analysis (what is vulnerable or at risk?), the valued attributes of concern (why are they important?), the external hazard (to what is the system vulnerable and exposed?), and a temporal reference (when?)–and the purpose of the assessment;
•    Describe the analytical framework applied;
•    Provide adequate detail regarding the data and methods used;
•    Address the uncertainty in underlying data and methods;
•    Present one or more maps portraying results;
•    Address the policy relevance of the mapping/spatial analysis.
Case studies and mapping projects are especially encouraged that:

•    were developed in conjunction with stakeholders (i.e., transdisciplinary science) and/or where mapping results were applied in planning and decision-making contexts;
•    utilize statistical techniques/novel methods to identify the drivers of risk and vulnerability;
•    use future scenarios for climate and/or socioeconomic systems;
•    integrate various streams of data (ranging from survey data and official statistics to Earth observation data);
•    seek to validate mapping results.

In addition to case study or location-specific applications, we invite papers that explore spatial methods as well as papers critically reflecting on climate risk and vulnerability mapping.

For further information or to submit a manuscript, please visit: https://www.mdpi.com/journal/sustainability/special_issues/Climate_Risk_Mapping

 

Spatial Statistics 2019: Towards Spatial Data Science

Conference date(s): 10 July 2019 - 13 July 2019

The conference will bring together leading scientists in the field of spatial statistics to debate and discuss how to make statistically sound decisions and judgments in the domain of spatial data science.

Issues of statistical learning, but also common methods for spatial and spatio-temporal interpolation, stochastic geometry, classifications, tessellation, networks, point processes, random sets, including Bayesian modelling will be presented in the new context of spatial data science.

Oral and paper abstracts are now invited on the above topics. They should be submitted using the online abstract submission system by the 18 January 2019.

For more information, see https://www.elsevier.com/events/conferences/spatial-statistics

Location: Spain
 

Call for Papers for Wittgenstein Centre Conference 2019 "Demographic Aspects of Human Wellbeing”

Submission deadline: 01 June 2019

Event Dates: 11-12 November 2019

The Wittgenstein Centre is pleased to announce the Call for Papers for its 2019 conference “Demographic Aspects of Human Wellbeing”.

Researchers at the Wittgenstein Centre are currently involved in several studies around economic and health aspects of human wellbeing and an ERC Advanced Grant on “The demography of sustainable human wellbeing”. In this context and with partial funding from this grant the conference wants to bring together researchers from around the world working on different aspects of human wellbeing with a specifically demographic perspective. The aim is to put demography more prominently on the table as a discipline that has much to contribute to the scientific study of human wellbeing, both in terms of its measurement and the analysis of its determinants. There will be invited speakers as well as an open call for papers and posters. Travel funding will be available for a limited number of selected speakers.

Examples of topics include:

•    Life expectancy based indicators of wellbeing
•    Wellbeing over the life course and over time
•    Applying demographic metabolism model to forecast wellbeing along cohort lines
•    Demographic differentials/inequalities in wellbeing
•    What matters more for wellbeing: age or gender, education or income?
•    Wellbeing and intergenerational support
•    Feed-backs from environmental change to human wellbeing


Detailed information on the call is to be found at: https://www.oeaw.ac.at/en/vid/events/calendar/conferences/demographic-aspects-of-human-wellbeing/

Location: Austria
 

11th International Conference on Climate Change: Impacts & Responses

Conference date(s): 16 April 2019 - 17 April 2019

Founded in 2009, the International Conference on Climate Change: Impacts & Responses aims to create an interdisciplinary forum for the discussion of climate change, its causes, its eco-systemic impacts, and its human impacts. The conference also explores technological, policy, strategic, and social responses to climate change.

Proposals for paper presentations, workshops/interactive sessions, posters/exhibits, colloquia, innovation showcases, virtual posters, or virtual lightning talks are invited.

For more information, see https://on-climate.com/2019-conference/call-for-papers

Location: Pryzbyla Center, The Catholic University of America, United States of America
 

Seminar on Multi-scale Population Scenarios for the U.S.

Event date(s): 01 April 2019

As part of the Population Dynamics and Environmental Change Seminar series, Leiwen Jiang of the Population Council will present on subnational population scenarios. These scenarios provide future societal and climate information critical for resolving future climate-related risks and response options at a scale more relevant to the systems being affected or taking action. For this reason, Shared Socioeconomic Pathway (SSP) narratives as well as quantitative elements including population and GDP have been downscaled to provide regional or local information. Existing approaches insufficiently capture what is likely the principle source of spatial heterogeneity in demographic outcomes: migration between sub-regions, which can significantly change the broad patterns of population distribution at a scale that lies between the national and the local. Jiang has developed a novel set of scenarios for internal (state to state) migration rates within the US, as well as an extension to the SSP narratives that links our migration assumptions to the broader SSP storylines.

For more information visit https://www.popcouncil.org/event/20908

Location: United States of America
 

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